Dmv Eye Test Chart

Dmv Eye Test Chart

Dmv Eye Test Chart

Dmv Eye Test Chart

Whether you’re getting a driver’s license for the first time or renewing your license, your vision will be screened to ensure you can safely operate a motor vehicle. While each state has different standards, it is common that you must have at least 20/40 vision in one or both eyes and 100-degree peripheral vision to pass the vision test and operate a motor vehicle without restrictions. If eyeglasses or contact lenses are necessary for you to pass the test, restrictions will be noted on your driver’s license.

If you fail the vision test, you should schedule an appointment with an eye care professional for a comprehensive eye examination to determine the cause of your vision problems and your treatment options. After your vision has been corrected by an eye care professional, you will still be required to pass the vision test before obtaining or renewing your driver’s license.

Dmv Eye Test Chart

Dmv Eye Test Chart

Dmv Eye Test Chart

THE VISUAL ACUITY TEST

While each state’s methods of testing are different, every state does require you to pass a vision test to obtain a driver’s license. Subsequent testing during the renewal process is at the discretion of the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). The vision test is not only for your safety, but for the safety of other drivers who share the road.

Some DMVs may only use the standard eye chart as their chosen visual acuity testing method and require you to clearly read one or several lines to determine if your vision is suitable for driving a motor vehicle. Some states may opt for a vision screening machine, where one looks through the machine and reads a chosen line by the administrator.

Dmv Eye Test Chart

Dmv Eye Test Chart

Dmv Eye Test Chart

Please note that these vision tests are not eye examinations, nor do they take the place of eye exams by a qualified eye care professional. Before obtaining or renewing your driver’s license, you should review your state’s vision standards for operating a motor vehicle and contact your local Department of Motor Vehicles with any questions or concerns.

By Daniel Beasley
Article Source: articledashboard.com