Eye Diagram For Kids

Eye Diagram For Kids

Eye Diagram For Kids

Eye Diagram For Kids

Hand-eye coordination begins during infancy through providing infants with objects and colorful toys that will encourage them to reach out and grasp them. By the age of 4-5 months infants can bring their hands into their field of vision, and during toddlerhood further progress in hand-eye coordination comes with the ability to see and grasp objects accurately. They develop the “pincer grasp” during this time.

By three to four years of age children learn to handle eating utensils and button small buttons. By five years of age the child’s hand-eye coordination is beginning to advance as he approaches, grasps and releases objects with precision and accuracy.

By six years of age the child’s visual orientation changes as they shift their gaze more frequently and follow the progress of objects rather than staring at the object. By the time they reach school age through middle childhood they make great advances in speed, timing and coordination of hand-eye coordination.

Eye Diagram For Kids

Eye Diagram For Kids

Eye Diagram For Kids

Between the ages of three and six it is important to provide as many opportunities for children to develop their hand-eye coordination. But, what to do when it rains, snows or gets dark too early? Because visual feedback is vital for fast and accurate hand movements it is important to allow children to continue to develop their hand-eye coordination.

One great solution is a giant floor puzzle. These puzzles are very colorful, made of large enough pieces to not harm the child if they put them in their mouth, and provide an opportunity to develop hand-eye coordination while learning shapes and patterns.

Over the years I have cared for many children, and I have observed their behavior with floor puzzles. I take the diagram of the completed puzzle and seal it in plastic so they can refer to it without destroying it. Children will spend a lot of time learning the puzzle, and once they do they always want an adult to watch them and spend time with them putting the puzzle together. When they are older they will only put it together 2 or 3 times before losing interest, but they always go back to it when bored indoors.

Eye Diagram For Kids

Eye Diagram For Kids

Eye Diagram For Kids

Safe and educational, giant floor puzzles make a great indoor activity for when the weather keeps them indoors.

By Betty Muscott
Article Source: ezinearticles.com